ESP & Genre studies

swales

John Swales is one of the most relevant authors at ESP studies. He has written several articles and books dealing with discourse, EAP, ESP or genre among many other applied linguistics topics.

Read the following article, one of the IBERICA issue devoted to celebrate AELFE 20th aniversary, and answer to the questions bellow:

A text and its commentaries: Toward a reception history of “Genre in three traditions” (Hyon, 1996)

Why are genre studies so important for ESP research?

Enumerate different kinds of quotations mentioned by this author derived from Hyon’s works.

You can submit your answer by using the comments option.

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4 thoughts on “ESP & Genre studies

  1. As I see it, Swales (2012) draws the attention of his readership to the multifarious factors which lead to a particular author’s recognition. In fact, Tardy (2004: 248) reminds us of Swales’ concept of ‘English as […] “a powerful carnivore gobbling up the other denizens of the academic linguistic grazing grounds” (p. 374)’, a view he had expressed as early as 1997.
    Swales identifies five characteristics which contributed to Hyon’s article being more quoted than others. These are: 1) ‘kairos or timelessness’; 2) that particular piece of research being ‘a review article’; 3) what he refers to as ‘the magic of number 3′, that is, classifying genre analysis in triads; 4) ‘ESL implications’, which were, at the time of writing that piece of scholarly work, very much in vogue and; 5) the presence of ‘quotable moments’. All things considered, the way a paper plays with the reader’s expectations contributes to an improved academic consideration. Therefore, and reading between the lines, we can assume that even if the quality is not as high when compared to another author’s production, it is possible to make a paper more successful than it should have been simply by taking into consideration what the potential critical reader expects.
    Rather than focusing on genre analysis as such, what Swales is doing in this paper is to make the reader aware of the way intertextuality keeps certain lines of research alive, while others are abandoned or, as the author puts it: ‘f[a]ll into benighted obscurity’.

  2. 1. Why are genre studies so important for ESP research?
    According to Hyon, genre studies are important because they represent a useful tool in the development of L1 and L2 writing skills. Yet, it is important to also bear in mind “contextual factors” (Bhatia, 2008). Furthermore, Hyon explains that genre research provides “insights into the linguistic features of written texts as well as useful guidelines for presenting these features in classrooms.”
    2. Enumerate different kinds of quotations mentioned by this author derived from Hyon’s works.
    The author quotes Hyland (2004) to describe the different ways of quoting a paper, which can be divided into four categories: block quotations, direct quotes, paraphrases and summaries.
    Regarding Hyon’s works, Swales indicates that there have been no block quotations of the former’s paper.
    Nevertheless, he does introduce several direct quotations, such as the following by Flowerdew: “Although Hyon (1996, p. 695) has pointed out that ‘… many ESP scholars have paid particular attention to detailing the formal characteristics of genres while focusing less on the specialized functions of texts and their surrounding social contexts’, this sociocultural context has been addressed in more recent ESP genre-based work.” It must be noted, however, that these direct quotations have not been numerous.
    The fact that Hyon’s work has failed to be reproduced in block quotations and many direct quotes indicates that it has not been cited on the grounds of containing “memorable quotes”.
    Swales further explicates that Hyon’s work has been cited mostly in a parenthetical way. He adds that “most citations are short, neutral and summative,” although there was one citation by Flowerdew that purported that her article was “widely-quoted” and “state-of-the-art”.
    He concludes that the 1996 paper is quoted for its “map-making achievement” and its “review of the ‘three traditions’” is used as a “framing device”, that is to set up the framework. Notwithstanding, it has “over 300 hits on Google Scholar and over 50 citations in the Web of Science.”

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  4. Why are genre studies so important for ESP research?
    Context is one of the decisive factors that determine language use. That is why genre, understood as a proper area in each context, becomes object of sudy. In her paper published in TESOL Quarterly (1996) Sunny Hyon compares ESP and SFL approaches with Rhetorical Genre Studies, and as Swales cites (Ibérica 24, 2012) “The investigation reveals that ESP and Australian genre research provides ESL intructors insights into the linguistic features of written texts as well as useful guidelines for presenting these features in classrooms. New Rhetoric scholarship, on the other hand, offers language teachers fuller perspectives on the institutioal contexts around academic and profesional genres and the fuctions genres serve within those settings.” (Hyon, 1996: 693)

    Ennumerate diffetent kinds of quotations mentioned by this autor derived from Hyon’s works.
    In orther to analyse Hyon’s 1996 paper reception history, Swales ( 2012) uses Hyland’s (2004) división of citations in four categories: Block quotations, direct quotes, paraphrases and summaries. As an example of block quotation, Swales (2012) mentions:

    (1) Although Hyon (1996, p. 695) has pointed out that “… many ESP scholars have paid particular attention to detailing the formal characteristics of genres while focusing less on the specialized functions of texts and their surrounding social contexts”, this sociocultural context has been addressed in more recent ESP genre-based work. (Flowerdew)

    He concludes that “No block quotation form the 1996 paper were found, and very few direct quotes… In contrast, most of the citations ara parenthetical, often placing Hyon (1996) in a group along with others.” (Swales, 2012) as we can see in the following examples:

    (2) When it comes to defining genres there is multiplicity of overlapping theories along with a range of competing terminologies (See Hyon, 1996, Johns, 2002). (Bruce)

    (3) Hyon (1996) originally distilled, and more recently Tardy (2009) and Flowerdew and Wan (2010) and Bawarshi and Reiff (2010) have discussed current approaches to genre analysis as falling into three broad schools of thought. (Lockwood)

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